Room by Emma Donoghue

4.png

“Scared is what you’re feeling. Brave is what you’re doing.”

— Emma Donoghue, Room

        Meet Jack. A curious and brave little fellow who finds comfort, joy and love in Room and Ma. Room is where he lives in. He has everything he needs, from books to television. His own room, inside Room, is a closet through which he hears the boogeyman every now and then at night—that’s Old Nick. Jack’s mom also lives under the same skylight. Telling Jack about stories and teaching him to hold a strict and fun schedule every day, Ma is the only person that Jack needs. She’d do anything for her son, the apple of her eyes. That’s Ma. Room is an intricate and brilliant novel that’s disturbing enough to be claimed a horror story. Emma Donoghue has written a novel that not only examines the world through the eyes and words of a 5 year old, but questions the very foundation of society that governs our daily lives. This novel is drenched in truth and virtue. It’s molded around a scary and sharply accurate depiction of life and doesn’t fail in serving wisdom on a silver platter. Room combines innocence and life in a heart-wrenching tale of love and discovery.

2.jpg

“Everybody’s damaged by something.”

— Emma Donoghue, Room

        Narrating a whole novel by a 5 year old is a challenge for titans. It not only means that you have to think and act like a child, but you also have to perfectly develop a character who’s malleable by life. If you never knew that children are sponges to experience, then you must have lived under a rock. Their ability to gather information is phenomenal. And Jack is no exception. He is by far one of the best characters ever created, at least when it comes down to a 5 year old. His power—if I may call it that—to absorb knowledge and to apply them to the letter is genuine and impressive. Throughout the novel, his voice can start off as a hassle. However, after a couple of pages and a quick adaptation, you’re easily accustomed to the missing words or wrong conjugation. His voice transcends the mistakes and manages to captivate readers. It’s so magical that you quickly learn to understand him and see what he sees, anywhere and anytime.

        They say that children are so innocent that lying is beyond their nature. They say that children hold more wisdom than some of our compatriots. Emma Donoghue succeeds in making Room the most captivating and thrilling adventure. An adventure that leads our dear protagonist in discovering the world outside of his knowledge. Split in 5 big parts, this novel grabs you by the collar and drags you through a beautiful and tear-inducing relationship between mother and son. It’s climax is bound to have your heart racing, while its finale will leave you in a state of introspection. Although the novel clings on setting Jack on various adventures and leaving readers with a lasting impression on how different the world is for him, I personally thought it could’ve cut on some events and focus on others. Apart from that, Jack’s personal growth and evolution is outstanding. Seeing him conflicted and attempting to understand his surrounding by using what is true for him helps Room deliver a stunning, yet disconcerting novel.

        An amazing aspect of this novel lies in its depiction of Jack as a 5 year old child. Not only did the character grow in an environment deprived of abstraction, Jack shows severe development and recession in child development. In fact, his life revolves on a limited number of objects and concepts. His main source of knowledge comes from his Ma and his Television. Albeit his extraordinary cognitive skills, abstraction is simplified for him to understand the world. What I enjoyed the most from him is the questions that he asks himself in moments of confusion and misunderstanding. It’s absolutely heart-breaking the sort of questions he asks himself because they not only lead to answers that could break him, but they’re also revelatory, eye-opening. Watching him fill his brain with new concepts and develop skills that should’ve been acquired a long time ago is an adventure that no one should miss. Jack is without a doubt, a person that you should meet.

3.png

“Stories are a different kind of true.”

— Emma Donoghue, Room

      Emma Donoghue can definitely flex her creativity muscles. Room is a thrilling and powerful novel. If you can grow attached to the voice of Jack, it will captivate you and you will find room to love it profoundly. Told through the voice of a five year-old, this novel discusses themes of time, space, home, rules and love like none other author have ever tried. If you ask me, there’s no better person than a child to tell you the cold hard facts about life. The vision of a child is probably one of the most innocent and practical one out there. Living such a haunting event, that Jack himself doesn’t realize, is a trial that no child should ever endure. But through his eyes, readers are able to learn a lot more than they thought they would. This book is a unique snowflake in literature. It stimulates your reflection and unveils its beauty, one word at a time. What are you waiting for? Go and meet Jack.

Did you read or watch Room? Brie Larson (who plays Ma) won Best Actress in a leading role at the Oscars for that very role! What did you think about the book or the movie?

You haven’t, you say? How about you read this story for yourself!

You can purchase a copy of Room by Emma Donoghue by clicking on this hyperlink !

Don’t forget to share your thoughts in the comment section below, as well as like and follow us so we can get you guys more reviews to enjoy!

MY OVERALL RATING: ★★★★☆/

Screen Shot 2015-07-23 at 11.24.49 PM

1.jpg

16 thoughts on “Room by Emma Donoghue

  1. j.belk says:

    Beautiful review, Lashaan. I’ve been wanting to watch the film for Room since it came out in theatres, but I’ve been holding off because I want to read the novel first. I’ve actually had Room for a good few months, & I am still extremely interested in reading it — your review just adds more excitement 😀

    -Jess @jbelkbooks

    Liked by 1 person

    • transhaan says:

      Thank you so much Jess! 😀 I also wanted to watch the movie as soon as possible, but the moment I heard it was based on a book diverted my attention instantly. I’m so glad that I got through the book first, and can finally watch the movie (that’s a lie… I have to wait for Trang to read and finish it first.) If your experience will be anything similar or better than mine, you’re going to adore the book! Can’t wait to find out what your thoughts are once you get the chance to read it!

      P.S. It’s a pretty fast read if you ask me. You’ll fly through the book in just one sitting, it’s just that amazing!

      – Lashaan

      Liked by 1 person

      • j.belk says:

        Haha, you are welcome, Lashaan! I hope you enjoy the film (when Trang is finished reading the book) just as much as you enjoyed the novel! I am intending to adore the book, but who knows until I read it, lol. I’ll definitely be sharing my thoughts with the blogosphere when I get to it, though..
        And YES that’s even better; I love a quick-read 😉

        -Jess @jbelkbooks

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Ayunda says:

    Totally agree with this review! It’s a very disturbing yet compelling read. Haven’t watched the movie yet, though, but I’m hoping I coul watch it soon 😊

    Like

  3. rainandcheese says:

    I definitely want to meet Jack.

    I’ve been planning to read the book since last year. I don’t think I’ve read a book from a five year old’s perspective, so this looks really interesting. From your review, the author pulled it off~

    Liked by 1 person

    • transhaan says:

      Yaaasss! I believe the author did an excellent job. Even incorporated some pop culture things that I grew up with; those references made me enjoy the book even more! 😀 I hope you find the time to read and enjoy this book. I can’t wait to watch the movie and see how it was done.

      – Lashaan

      Like

    • transhaan says:

      I haven’t heard about the book till the movie came out. Now that I’ve went through one helluuuvaa ride, I can finally check out the movie (after Trang finishes the book too). I’m curious how well it was done, considering the book is narrated by a 5 year old, while a movie wouldn’t take the same exact direction. Can’t wait to find out! 😀

      – Lashaan

      Liked by 1 person

    • transhaan says:

      It was an excellent movie! I definitely enjoyed the direction it took, compared to the book. One thing’s for sure, the book will give a completely different angle to the story. In fact, the book gives more insight on the kid’s point of view (after all, he’s the one narrating it in the book), while the movie gave more space and spotlight for the mom (Brie Larson). She definitely nailed her role, and gave us some very amazing scenes. I definitely appreciate how the movie executed the adaptation. Even with all the changes and added dialogues, it was still an amazing movie. You should definitely give the book a try if it’s piqued your interest! 😀

      – Lashaan

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Read Diverse Books says:

    Room was heart-wrenching and I admit that to have cried when I read it.
    Jack really was the best 5 year-old character I have ever read in a novel. The first half of the novel was perfect and I enjoyed seeing the world through’s Jack’s eyes. But after the escape, I wanted a broader perspective.
    But that’s a minor and very subjective issue. I haven’t watched the movie yet 😡 though I will soon! It’s next on my Netflix DVD queue.

    Liked by 1 person

    • transhaan says:

      The second half sure was different in many ways. I understand your concern for it. As for the movie: it’s a nice adaptation (you’ll find difference, especially for the second half of the movie). It’s also more focused on the mother than on the kid, which gives Brie Larson a great opportunity to showcase her talent (which she did! :D). Hope you enjoy it as much as we did!

      – Lashaan

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s