Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

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murderorientexpresscoverTitle: Murder on the Orient Express
Series: Hercule Poirot #10
Stand-alone: Yes
Author(s): Agatha Christie
Publisher: Harper
Format: Paperback
Original Release Date: 1934
Pages: 315
Genre(s): Mystery, Classics
ISBN13: 9780062073501


“The impossible could not have happened, therefore the impossible must be possible in spite of appearances.”

— Agatha Christie, Murder on the Orient Express

In this timeless classic, Agatha Christie challenges the world to dethrone her from a position that only she could attain through a inconceivable, gritty and captivating crime story.

All hail the Queen of Mystery! All hail the One and Only! Best-selling author of all time, having also written under the pseudonym of Mary Westmacott, Agatha Christie has created two of the most iconic characters of all time, Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple. Her novels are known world-wide, from And Then There Were None to Murder at the Vicarage, and are still discovered, read and reread by countless readers. I for one have never read any of them till today, and boy was this formidable.

The great thing about the Murder on the Orient Express—know that there is nothing great about murder—is how any reader can easily pick it up and discover the star of this novel: Hercule Poirot. His name has been tossed around with the likes of Sherlock Holmes, Batman and detective Colombo, but it isn’t everyone who knows of his exploits. In this classic crime story that presents us with a savage crime in a claustrophobic environment, Hercule Poirot unveils his talents with grace and finesse.

Image result for hercule poirot gif

The great detective is known by the world for his ability to solve crimes and you already understand that he is not someone you want on your case if you’re trying to avoid remain anonymous after committing a crime. His way is extremely structured, methodical and meticulous. It works a bit by elimination, sort of like what you’d do in a multiple choice exam, but it also comes with a touch of guess work. However, Poirot also knows his psychology of human beings. He can tell what is normal from what is not, and will strategically and brilliantly play on the subtle hints you give him to extract the information he wants from you.

What I loved about his character was also how straight-forward he can be. There are times I just couldn’t hold a giggle following a sly and snarky comment from him. Hercule Poirot also has a very majestic way of presenting his thoughts without being condescending or event showing any signs of a superiority complex. Even if he is attracted by cases that are uniquely fascinating, he still has a heart and shows it through his manner of speaking, and especially with the ending.

The ending of this crime story is where everything is at. It is one of the main reason why I would ever recommend this book highly to readers who have yet to pick up a book by Agatha Christie. There is a moment towards the end of the book where you’ll think the story is insane, improbable and unlikely. You’ll come to believe that the author has failed to deliver and completely flopped. But just as that thought was ready to spread like a virus, Agatha Christie will toss in another magnifique twist that will simply blow your minds away. This is one of those rare books that had me smiling at the ending and looking at the book like:

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All great detectives also have an incredible sea of knowledge to help them in their cases. Hercule Poirot is no exception. There is a sprinkle of historical fiction within this novel that aid in creating those beautiful twists and turns. But there’s one thing that you should know about Agatha Christie, or at least about this novel, there’s just no way you’ll know where it’s headed. This is no story that you could easily guess, but if you do, you’ll be amazed by how it is executed. There’s just something so exciting about a crime story that you just can’t guess how it’ll be solved.

Hercule Poirot is a source of inspiration for so many shows and movies. His ways and his stories are undoubtedly fascinating and his character is a legendary icon in the world of literature, and even in cinema. Murder on the Orient Express might have been an exciting page-turner devoid of useless information that was able to keep me hooked till the very end, but it will not be my last novel by Agatha Christie. Oh, hell no. After this one, I think I’ll just collect and read every single one of her books. That’s right. I’ll learn about every single case that her mind was able to come up with and see how she brilliantly closes those cases with her staple characters. Yep. Watch me.


Murder on the Orient Express (2017) with Kenneth Branagh as the great Hercule Poirot hits theatres today! If it wasn’t for this movie adaptation, I don’t think I would’ve been so motivated to fit this book into my reading schedule. 😛

I have yet to see it, but there is also the classic 1974 adaptation with Albert Finney as Hercule Poirot!

Have you seen any of these adaptations? Do you plan to see them? Have you read it yet? Plan to? 😀


You can order your copy now!

Amazon (USA) – Amazon (Canada)Chapters IndigoBook Depository

MY OVERALL RATING: ★★★★★

Till next time,

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69 thoughts on “Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

  1. Priyasha says:

    I love Agatha Christie’s book , they are so good . I personally love “And then they were none.” But I haven’t read this one but it is on my TBR . Perhaps I’ll see the movie .🎬 Fantastic Review 📖

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      That’s definitely the next one I’m reading! I hear it has an even more mind-blowing of an ending than this one. 😮 I didn’t think that was possible. But you totally have to try this one out, or maybe try the movie out instead. 😉 Thank you so much for reading!! I appreciate that so much!! 😛

      Like

  2. Drew @ The Tattooed Book Geek says:

    Fantastic review for a great book. Poirot is an amazing character. I’ve seen the older version of Murder on the Orient Express and enjoyed it and I’ve also seen the TV version from 2010 – I think with David Suchet. It’s a fantastic adaptation.

    I loved the Poirot TV show but haven’t read many of the books. I’ll probably catch the new version of the film when it’s on TV, whenever I see the advert it looks good but I have trouble associating Kenneth Brannagh as Poirot. As a fan of the TV show David Suchet is Poirot and the Brannagh character looks completely different.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      Thanks man. I appreciate that. I have that show on my list on Netflix hahah I haven’t seen any adaptation of Poirot, except the 1974 one for Murder on the Orient Express after a friend of mine had recommended it to me back in high school. I barely remembered anything of it–which was a good thing since it made the ending of the book sooooo much better! I have to admit that I’ve always seen Poirot as either David Suchet or Albert Finney. It’s really hard to imagine Kenneth Brannagh in that role, but maybe he’ll pull it off, who knows. The 2017 adaptation is mostly impressive for the overall casting though. So many amazing actors in one movie! I haven’t looked it up, but I do wonder if they’ll keep Kenneth Brannagh in order to adapt other Poirot stories. That would be pretty cool.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Meggy | Chocolate'n'Waffles says:

    I’ve read it! xD A month ago, I had not read any Christie and now I’ve read this one and And Then They Were None! I love Poirot, I giggled too, he’s a very well-crafted character and has that ability to take you with him on his search and the books are just fab for a great reading time!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      Which one did you prefer the most of the two books??? 😮 I’m definitely going to read And Then There Were None next. Even if it doesn’t have Poirot in it, I have the feeling that it is truly amazing! And man, the moment I finished Murder on the Orient Express, I was compelled to pick up more stories by Poirot! Can’t wait!! 😀 Thanks for reading, Meggy. I truly appreciate the time you took to do so. 😉

      Like

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      You haaaaave tooooooo!!!! I was just like you a week ago and man, had I known how good it was, I would’ve read this book WAAAAYY earlier in my life!! And man, you totally made me laugh at the book dancing comment hahahah Thank you so much for the comment though, I’m exploring the creation of these gifs and just playing around with it just to see what people life to see visually (since I also like to show everyone the exact edition of the book I read for the review). 😀 Thank you for reading, Dani!!! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Bookstooge says:

    And then there were none was my favorite Christie. I need to get around to this,but I went through a spell of trying a bunch of Poirot novels and ended up giving up on Christie because of them. Can’t stand Poirot.

    So while I hear really good things about Orient Express, I have a huge barrier to overcome before I try it…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      You’ve read other Poirot mysteries but not Murder on the Orient Express?! Maaaaaan, that is uncool! Unless you tried to go in order, that would be another story. You definitely have to give this one a try. I’d be curious to see how you like it compared to And Then There Were None. That one will be my next Christie book and I can’t wait to finally read it.

      Hopefully that barrier will somehow get shattered in the near future.

      Liked by 1 person

        • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

          Ah ha! Why am I not surprised that you tried to read it in order! 😛 Honestly… I was going to do it like you did, but when THIS classic was the TENTH book in the series… I couldn’t wrap my head around this idea anymore.. 😛 And a movie adaptation of this one only made me realize that I just had to go on and do it. After all, I never heard anyone say it couldn’t be read as a stand-alone, so I was a happy fella! 😀
          Yep, that would be pretty cool. A little bit of mystery to Bookstooge’s reading habits. 😀

          Liked by 1 person

  5. Elizabeth says:

    I’m definitely going to check out an Agatha Christie book. Any recommendations for a first-time reader? I don’t know if you know, but there are some Agatha Christie video games out. I played one on my computer a while back before I knew they were books, because mystery games are right up my alley (I’m obsessed with Nancy Drew games even as a 26 year old lol). But I just looked them up again and there’s a game version of Murder on the Orient Express. 😊 Thanks for the review!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      I was a first-time reader myself just a week ago! Murder on the Orient Express is my first book and I’m EXTREMELY happy with my experience with it. If anything I’d recommend this or And Then There Were None (I haven’t read this one, but it is the next one I’ll be reading by Agatha Christie). I have actually seen those games around, but I always overlooked them since I’m not a fan of games based on books/movies (or even books based on movies, for example). Pretty cool that there’s one for this one, but I can already tell you that I’d never have solved this case if I was Poirot hahahah Thanks for that tidbit! 😛 I do hope you’ll be able to enjoy your first Agatha Christie book soon and that you’ll love it as much as I did, Elizabeth!!! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • Elizabeth says:

        Oops, I missed your comment about this being your first! I hear you on that though. Games based on movies are the absolute worst because they produce them so fast to keep up with the hype. I guess I don’t have much experience with games based on books. I do kind of remember not loving the Agatha Christie one because I never finished it. 😬

        Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      Thank you so much!!! I immediately placed it among my all time favourite books too. What a stunning classic! Have you tried other books by Agatha Christie? What would be your other two recommendations? I’d assume that And Then There Were None is one of them. 😛

      Liked by 1 person

      • nicolechinnici says:

        Yes, I’ve read at least a couple dozen of her books! Definitely And Then There Were None! They’re all good, and although I slightly prefer the Hercules Poirot series to Miss Marple, you may want to try one of those. I recall enjoying Murder at the Vicarage. If you prefer to stick with Poirot, I really liked The Mysterious Affair at Styles and Death in the Nile. Okay, that’s already more than two, so I’ll stop there lol, but so many of her books are so good! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

        • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

          A couple dozen!!! Maaaaan. I’d sooo want to go through that many ASAP. I have yet to acquaint myself with Miss Marple, so I think Murder at the Vicarage would be a nice introduction to her character for me. I also have Death in the Nile… but I’m scared that I might be better off reading a couple earlier stories with Poirot before that one since it’s like the 17th in the series? I’ll definitely keep a note about The Mysterious Affair at Styles though. Thank you so much for recs!!! 😀

          Liked by 1 person

          • nicolechinnici says:

            Haha I’ve been reading these for probably twenty years now! (Which makes me feel really old 🙈) You’re welcome! These series can pretty much be read in any order, each book stands on its own really well, but I do understand wanting to start at the beginning. Hope you enjoy, I’d love to hear your thoughts on the other books!! 😀

            Liked by 1 person

  6. Beth (Reading Every Night) says:

    Great review for this book Lashaan. 🙂 I’ve heard so many amazing things about Agatha Christie’s books, my mum loves them, but I’ve never actually picked one up myself.
    After what you’ve said about this one, and given that the film is out now as well, I’m really tempted to actually pick it up (I mean, I already know how it ends, this is one of those stories where I saw the film first so now I need to read the book). I’m curious to see how it all comes together in the story because I reckon there will be some differences. 🙂
    Again great review. 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  7. ichabod2014ic says:

    Great review, Lashaan.
    No, I have not read any Christie novels, but I have seen MANY film adaptations. Miss Plumtartt and I enjoyed all of the BBC, David Suchet dramatizations of the Poirot novels, EXCEPT for ‘Murder on the Orient Express’. Poirot is so charming in all of his stories, but in ‘Murder on the Orient Express’, he is in a foul mood the entire time. I liked the old Albert Finney version better than the David Suchet version, but it too, is quite grim, as opposed to the other Poirot’s which are all so light-hearted.
    I highly recommend the Peter Ustinov versions of Poirot. ‘Murder under the Sun’, and Death on the Nile’!!!
    Not accurate, by any stretch, but the early sixties series of Miss Marple mystery movies starring Margaret Rutherford are most charming.
    There have been many film adaptations of ‘Ten Little N-Words’, no, that’s not nice, ‘Ten Little Indians’, no, that is no longer politically correct either, um, oh yeah, ”And Then There Were None’. My favorite is from 1945, starring Walter Huston, Mischa Auer, and many other wonderful actors.
    I need to find an Agatha Christie novel that has not been made into a movie that I can read. :-/
    Happy Reading!
    ~Icky. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      Thank you so much, Icky! And man. You sure do know how to shock me! More than Agatha Christie does! The Great Icky hasn’t read an Agatha Christie book yet?!?! However, your experience with the TV show/movie adaptations does compensate for it! 😀 I’ve only seen the Albert Finney adaptation of Murder on the Orient Express way back in high school, but I have no memory of how it all went down. I just know I was truly entertained by it! I also have the TV series with Suchet on my Netflix list. My only obstacle to starting the series is… wanting to read all the books first… Probably an inconceivable idea considering the number of books Agatha Christie has written with that character!! I’ll definitely keep a note of those two movies with Peter Ustinov. Your recommendations will not be forgotten! 😀 I actually have Death on the Nile too! The book, I mean.
      Oh man, back in high school, a French course teacher that I didn’t have had given the French translation of And Then There Were None as required reading to my friends. It was called “Dix petits nègres”. I actually thought it was a bad joke or something. I have yet to understand why on Earth it is called like that… And Then There Were None will be my next Agatha Christie, and hopefully it’ll answer that question along the way…
      Thank you so much for all your awesome knowledge. You truly do surprise me with everything you know! Always a huge pleasure to have it all shared with me. Take care, Icky!! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Anna @MyBookishDream says:

    I’m really glad that you enjoyed this book! It’s definitely one of my favourite Agatha Christie novels. 😀 Poirot is such a fascinating character and I always enjoy reading his adventures. And I completely agree about the ending! It’s something that I never saw coming. Awesome review! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      Thank you so much Anna!!! I truly loved Poirot. He’s one of those detectives you just don’t see anymore. Then again, anyone who tries to create a character like him today would probably get eaten alive by critics for being “unoriginal”. What else did you read by Christie? What would you recommend as a MUST by her? I plan on trying And Then There Were None next, but after that.. I just have too many places where to start. Would love to hear your recs on the subject since it sounds like you’ve read a couple of her books yourself!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Anna @MyBookishDream says:

        Yeah, he is definitely a detective that you don’t see anymore. But Christie has written so many Poirot books, so we can enjoy his character as much as we want!! 🙂 And Then There Were Non is one I definitely recommend! That is definitely one of the best Christie books that I have read. Other Poirot books that I would recommend are The Murder of Roger Ackroyd (which is my favourite), Death on the Nile and The A.B.C. Murders.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

          I haven’t heard people mention that one too often (The Murder of Roger Ackroyd), but I’ll definitely remember it was your favourite now hahaha I also have Death on the Nile, until I realized it was the 17th book in the series… In your opinion, are those particular stories stand-alones, like Murder on the Orient Express? It’s one of the reasons why I didn’t read Death on the Nile. It made me want to read it in the order the books were released. What would you recommend? 😛

          Liked by 1 person

          • Anna @MyBookishDream says:

            Yeah, my favourite isn’t one of the most talked about – I just picked it up randomly and ended up loving it! Those that I recommended are definitely standalones, like Murder on the Orient Express. I’m reading them rather randomly, as I have heard that nearly all of her Poirot books work as standalones and I really can’t be bothered to read them in the order they were released in! 😂

            Liked by 1 person

            • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

              Gosh, I remember when I told myself that I’d read everything by Agatha Christie, and in order. But then I realized Murder on the Orient Express was 10th in that list… That just killed me. I was just glad to have heard that that story in particular was a perfect stand-alone story though. The recent movie adaptation just pushed me to finally read it and confirm my love for Agatha Christie’s writing, Poirot and these kinds of crime stories! All right. I’ll definitely put Death on the Nile 3rd on my of Christie books to read since I already have it and look for the ones you recommended. Thanks for the recs, Anna. I really appreciate it!! 😀

              Liked by 1 person

  9. Zezee says:

    I liked this one as well but thought it was okay (or rather, in retrospect I think it’s just okay). I like the twist in who the murderer is though and by the end was interested in reading more of her books. I still am because I still want to be wowwed by her stories.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      I know that by the end of this one, I wanted to read everything she ever wrote. I just like her writing style and the way she creates her characters. It was also remiscent of the way I liked detectives to solve cases as a kid too. I totally prefer this to what modern crime thrillers do. Hope your next run-in with Agatha Christie will be even more mind-blowing! 🙂

      Like

  10. ichabod2014ic says:

    On a related note, I have a conspiracy that I would like to share, especially since you are a Netflix Luke Cage fan: In one of the last episodes of the Luke cage series, Claire Is on the run with two other people. She says, “People are being taken out, one by one, like that Agatha Christie novel ‘ ‘Ten Little Indians'”, and she is admonished by her companion, ”Hey, you can’t say that”, meaning it was politically incorrect to use the term ‘Indian’. This, I think, was an inside joke on the books troubled title history. When I re-watched the show, this scene was gone. I think it was considered too insensitive and was censored. Did you catch that line?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      It somewhat rings a bell, but I can’t recall the exact reference. In Luke Cage, I do remember that it included a BUNCH of Easter eggs for bookworms though. I remember seeing Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison in it. There were also a bunch of novels by Afro-americans; a lot of them I ended up adding to my TBR too hahah But the one with Agatha Christie and it being deleted is interesting. I do remember the comment she made about disappearing though.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Inge | The Belgian Reviewer says:

    I’m a fan! Agatha Christie’s books were among the first I read (not counting children’s before) and really made me get into reading. I also loved seeing Belgian (couldn’t resist) detective Hercule Poirot on the screen, David Suchet was so spot on! I probably read it but I see myself reading several of her books again in the future! Great review!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Books, Vertigo and Tea says:

    Wonderful! I am super late to the Agatha Christie party. Can each of the books in Poirot.series be read as stand alone or does each case tie in? Sometimes I find the lead detective or characters develops better if you start at point A so I have to ask 😉 I really want to pick this up! Also, I had no clue about the pseudonym!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      Thank you! No worries. No one’s ever late to my parties. 😉 Crazy the whole pseudonym thing huh? It blew my mind too! She’s written even more books than I thought she did!!!

      I initially wanted to read Agatha Christie’s Poirot stories in the order she released them until I realized Murder on the Orient Express was 10th on that list. No way was I going to wait that long for this masterpiece. The release of the trailer for the new movie adaptation motivated me to finally start this (also my first Agatha Christie book). I can assure you that this one can be PERFECTLY read as a stand-alone.

      From what I’ve learned, most if not all of Poirot’s stories can be read as stand-alones. While I have 2-3 other MUST-READ Poirot stories that I’ll read immediately without respecting the order, in the far future I’ll probably start from book 1 and complete the whole run (without re-reading the ones I’ll have already read).

      But Danielle…. You HAVE to try this one first. Or try And Then There Were None (although it doesn’t have Poirot), unless you’ve already visited that one. And Then There Were None will be my next Christie and I just can’t wait to get back to Agatha Christie’s writing style! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      I was exactly like you, Marie. I knew about her books, especially Poirot, but I had never tried anything of her until now. I can tell you that this was a SPLENDID place to start though! I’d highly recommend it 😉 Hope you enjoy the movie too!! Thank you so much for reading!! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  13. theorangutanlibrarian says:

    hehe gotta admit I never had any intention of reading Christie (simply cos I don’t read much in the mystery department) BUT your review and the buzz going round about the movie coming out has made me super curious!! I can’t believe it- but now I actually want to know what the deal with Poirot is and what’s the deal with the ending!! I’m gonna have to check this out now, aren’t I? 😉 Brilliant review!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      Oh, yeh, I still remember when you first mentioned that hahah The ending alone is worth the ride–haha see what I did there! 😀 And Then There Were None will be the next one I’ll read and I hear its ending is even more impressive! 😮 Hope you give it a shot someday. Thank you for reading! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

      • theorangutanlibrarian says:

        hehehe yes 😉 Thought I might as well be honest about it after confessing it to the world 😉 Oh well that’s great!! I think I probably will… one day- there are plenty of genres and books I said I’d never read that I now love- I’ll get to it, but it’ll be babysteps 😉 You’re welcome! 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  14. Dani @ Perspective of a Writer says:

    GAH!!!! I take back what I said on the batman review!! YOU TOTALLY KILLED praising this book!!! I admit that Hercule Poirot and Miss Marple are a couple of my favorite detectives… and I may even be able to say that Poirot is THE favorite for me… I have ALL the dvds with David Suchet and yes I even rewatch them… I’ve read the stories too, lest you think I neglect those… and they are marvelous… This particular story is quite shocking I have seen it several ways and the book is the best but the shows are nothing to sneeze at…. 🙂 Okay enough gushing over the character… I LOVED your review and I hope you do hunt down her others. My writing partner has read every one!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      Hahahahah yep! It gets pretty apparent when it’s a 4 or 5 star books and the difference between them. 😛 I’m so glad to hear you’ve also read them!!! Interesting that Poirot is your favourite though!!!! I can’t put him before Sherlock. Not yet anyways, and I doubt I ever will too! 😀 Is there a particular Christie story that you loved and would highly recommend? Or maybe even something your writing partner might recommend from Christie? I have And Then There Were None lined up next, but after that, there’s a couple of picks, but I still want to know your (or your partner’s) thoughts! 😀 Thank you so much for reading, Dani!!

      Like

  15. Evelina @ AvalinahsBooks says:

    I love the way you do GIFs for covers now! Cool idea.

    I actually haven’t read this one, but I feel like I would be spoiled, cause there was this one point in my life when the national TV was airing all of Poirot (with David Suchet!) during me and mom’s coffee time 😀 guess who more or less watched them all, if a little bit loosely? The others might have not stuck, but this one did, so I know how it ends. And I think the mystery was really cool.

    I am curious to read some Agatha Christie one day, but I guess I’ll have to pass on this one cause spoilers :/

    And yep, how can you possibly not love Hercule Poirot 😀 he’s a really cool character.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Lashaan (Bookidote) says:

      HAhaah thank you so much for that comment. I have been exploring different ways to present it, and this one was fun to do (a bit long though). I might end up using it a bit more often for a while now though! 😀

      Oh no! I’d still recommend it just to see how it was written though, but of course, only if you’re in the mood for it. Sometimes knowing the ending can be quite the deterrent.

      Like

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