Justice League: Injustice League by Geoff Johns

details
Title: Justice League.
Volume: 6.
Story-arc: Injustice League.
Universe:
 The New 52.
Writer(s): Geoff Johns.
Artist(s): Doug Mahnke, Jason Fabok, Ivan Reis, Scott Kolins, Keith Champagne, Scott Hanna, Christian Alamy, Mark Irwin, Ray McCarthy, Joe Prado.
Colourist(s): Andrew Dalhouse, Brad AndersonRob Reis.
Letterer(s): Dezi Sienty, Nick J. Napolitano & Carlos M. Mangual.
Publisher: DC Comics.
Format: Paperback.
Release Date: March 15th, 2016.
Pages: 272.
Genre(s): Comics, Science-Fiction.
ISBN13: 9781401258528.
My Overall Rating: ★★★☆☆.

Previously on the DC Universe New 52’s Justice League series:
Justice League (Vol. 1): Origin by Geoff Johns
Justice League (Vol. 2): The Villain’s Journey by Geoff Johns
Justice League (Vol. 3): Throne of Atlantis by Geoff Johns
Justice League (Vol. 3.5): Trinity by Geoff Johns
Justice League (Vol. 4): The Grid by Geoff Johns
Forever Evil (Vol. 4.5) by Geoff Johns
Justice League (Vol. 5): Forever Heroes by Geoff Johns

thoughts

While the threat born from the epic Forever Evil crossover event was dissolved before Earth saw its end, there are several seeds of destruction planted in the story that promises a chaotic confrontation in the near future. For the time being, the aftermath is essentially focused on Superman’s greatest nemesis and his sudden absolution by the people around the world following his act of heroism. To be seen as a hero and not the root of all evil is indeed something new for Lex Luthor. However, the troubles that have been rerouted towards Earth by the Crime Syndicate bide their time and what is in store for the heroes of the universe is likely going to be beyond their wildest nightmares.  Superstar writer Geoff Johns and a league of fantastic artists—including Doug Mahnke, Jason Fabok, Ivan Reis and Scott Kolins—continue their journey into bringing to life one of the greatest Justice League comic book run of all time as they explore old and new enemies in the midst of an impending pandemonium.

What is Justice League: Injustice League about? Following the arrival of the Crime Syndicate and their despicable attempt at world domination—needing a new home now that they have lost their own world to the hands of an unknown yet powerful entity—Lex Luthor has garnered the attention of humankind with his triumphant and honorable leadership that allowed him to become Earth’s saviour. While the public opinion is favourable and has helped him sore to success post-invasion, the Justice League is still skeptical of this man’s true intentions. Unfortunately for them, their latest member of the Justice League is none other than Lex Luthor himself but he’ll have to prove himself to the eyes of these heroes if he is to be trusted. Collecting Justice League #30-39, this volume collects two story arcs with one serving as an introduction for fearful Jessica Cruz and the second presenting an unlikely alliance to stop a virus from destroying the planet.

“We are us. You believe you are the dominant species. You are incorrect.”

— Geoff Johns

Considering how uncommon it is, it is such a treat to get two story arcs in one volume. However, were they any good? The first story arc focused on an origin story for Jessica Cruz, the latest victim to the Power Ring’s ring. While Lex Luthor attempts to blackmail his way to a seat at the Justice League’s inner circle and the world learns of the benefits that come from treating him as an ally rather than a villain, Jessica Cruz struggles with her new fate as a host to an evil ring that has a mind of its own. The second story arc introduces the Amazo virus, a secret weapon developed by Lex Luthor that is suddenly and accidentally released and threatens humankind with its extinction if the remaining heroes, including Lex Luthor himself, don’t create a cure in time. Throughout these stories, there are some subplots that are introduced and superficially-explored, e.g. the Doom Patrol’s introduction, but the spotlight remains on Lex Luthor and his ability to prove himself to the Justice as a hero of the universe rather than the bringer of doom.

While the volume was thoroughly action-packed from start to finish, there were too many elements that were slightly far-fetched attempted by writer Geoff Johns and other plot decisions that were too obvious in their nature, leading the reader on, although they could already guess where things were going. Besides these issues, the artwork continues to be decent in this volume. It is particularly incredible when artist Jason Fabok takes the lead as his visual style is exactly what the Justice League comic book series was meant to illustrate, an approach that is able to both capture the epic scale of the event while also encapsulating the emotional depth of the characters, from joy to fear. The colouring is also excellent and doesn’t fail to portray a darker tone to the story while allowing superpowers to add the flashy and colourful tones. A controlled-dose of humour throughout the banter also contributes to the lighter tones to an otherwise darker story.

Justice League: Injustice League is an action-packed chapter serving as an aftermath exploration of Lex Luthor’s challenge to win his spurs to the eyes of Earth’s greatest heroes.


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15 comments

  • My question about Luthor suddenly becoming one of the good guys is: Is he just doing his usual grab for power or is he really going good so the artists can introduce a new villain to take his place? I tend to think it is the first option as I just don’t EVER see him being one of the good guys.

    Liked by 1 person

  • So you did not really buy what he tried to do he? That’s too bad because two story arcs in one book is a boon and by the way your describe them, they had lots of potential!

    Liked by 1 person

  • Ah, I wonder if there are some unwritten rules of conduct for DC, like: Luthor can never be redeemed for real, but you can play with him ad nausea, or something like that… At some point, it all just doesn’t come as a surprise any longer 😉

    Liked by 1 person

      • I do wonder about it – the ultimate redemption arc, from hatred for one he perceived ever better than him to actual comprehension of Superman’s goals and values, and sharing of them even despite personal dislikes – I for one would love to read that one! 😁

        Liked by 1 person

        • It is indeed fascinating! However, I tend to believe that what sort of blocks him from ever really “accepting” Superman is all the reputation/glory/anything related to narcism that he sort of doesn’t gain from sharing the spotlight with Superman hahah

          Liked by 1 person

  • You’re right, there probably were too many ideas crammed in at once but I still feel Johns’ run is stronger and more coherent to Snyder’s overall – even though I’ve quite enjoyed the Snyder/Tynion run (especially the recent “Doom War” arc). I did like the introduction of Jessica Cruz as I think she’s a really interesting character, just like Simon Baz in Johns’ Green Lantern run – it’s not surprising that the two were teamed up for their own Green Lantern book during Rebirth!

    Liked by 1 person

    • John’s run is already more consistent than Snyder’s to this date but I like that Snyder is making it his own cosmic thing too. It gives it a completely different scope and more room for him to explore new things that ultimately expands what Snyder introduced with the dark multiverse and all. And yes, Jessica Cruz’s addition was pretty good in its own right! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  • Heros becoming villains et villains becoming heroes… so… what defines a hero? 😱 Anyway, great review, Lashaan, I liked the difference between “superstar writer” and the artwork that is just “decent” 😂😋

    Liked by 1 person

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